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Have you ever tried the BARF diet for your dogs?
Poll ended at Fri Jun 16, 2006 4:38 pm
What's a BARF diet? 60%  60%  [ 6 ]
Heard of it, sounds stupid. 10%  10%  [ 1 ]
Sounds good, but too much trouble. 20%  20%  [ 2 ]
Tried it, didn't like it. 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Tried it, liked it. 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Tried it, neither liked it nor disliked it. 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Heard of it, wondered about it, haven't tried it yet. 10%  10%  [ 1 ]
Total votes : 10
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 26, 2009 9:41 pm 
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Here in Illinois we are able to purchase unlimited doe tags.Not too mention calling the sheriff for deer hit by cars is a good idea.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 01, 2009 11:52 pm 
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plottluvr wrote:
The diet you have laid out...how often is that fed to the dogs? Do you supplement during the day with anything else as "treats"? Such as chicken necks etc.

I was also curious if beef trimmings or organ meats (livers etc) could be used as well as the chicken.



Truly, there are no "rules" so to speak. In nature, dogs eat what they can. They forage and eat "this and that" as they come upon it in the hunt.

We humans have schedules, and so we cannot spend all day giving our dogs bits and pieces of their feed. So we tend to feed once a day, and we try to create "balance" in the diet we provide. Yes, absolutely adding organ meats, trimmings (and especially fats) to the diet will be excellent for them. Regarding "how much," let your eyeballs be your guide as to your dogs' weight.

If you plan on hunting your dogs, of course have them be at the far end of "hungry" when you turn them loose, as hungry dogs hunt and satisfied dogs sleep :D

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 12:06 pm 
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Sorry guys, I know this is an "old subject" from a few wks back, but I enjoy reading these posts and finally made myself a user name and account and had a question on this topic.

I have no interest in feeding a raw diet and am very satisfied with the brand of feed I use. But i do tend to give my dog a handful of turkey or chicken slices etc, just for some raw meat, every now and then. My question is, I have heard to never feed "pork" products ever...for example, bologne or ham. That this could cause intestinal problems. Had a buddy once that fed his dog some cooked ham that was too "old" and it made the dog real lifeless and sick. Vet stated it was from the ham that was "bad" and had he waited much longer the dog could have perished.

Anyways, just curious on your thoughts! Thanks, great website by way!

Michael


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2009 7:29 pm 
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MRatliff wrote:
My question is, I have heard to never feed "pork" products ever...for example, bologne or ham. That this could cause intestinal problems. Had a buddy once that fed his dog some cooked ham that was too "old" and it made the dog real lifeless and sick. Vet stated it was from the ham that was "bad" and had he waited much longer the dog could have perished.

Anyways, just curious on your thoughts! Thanks, great website by way!

Michael


never heard of that. i have given mine RAW pork many times with no problems. i know some guys in texas that feed mostly RAW pork.

i have seen dogs get into a rotten old stinkin carcass before and lived to hunt again LOL

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 10:40 am 
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Feeding raw pork is not a good idea. Humans and dogs can get worms from it. I've fed my dogs cooked pork with no problems.

Here's a link on it.
http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictio ... rychinosis

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 11:26 am 
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plottluvr wrote:
Feeding raw pork is not a good idea. Humans and dogs can get worms from it. I've fed my dogs cooked pork with no problems.

Here's a link on it.
http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictio ... rychinosis


Thats kinda what I have always heard. In this case I stated above, I believe it was cooked ham....but had gone bad, pretty much sat in the fridge too long. So just like humans, they will get sick as well. In his case, the dog got close to deathly sick! Thx for the link, Ill check it out!


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 5:35 pm 
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i also worm my dogs regularly :wink:


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 19, 2009 9:02 pm 
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The reason why raw pork is considered bad is because they get a special kind of worm called trichinosis. These worms can be potentially fatal and are much, much harder to get rid of than standard worms.

This is why the jews call pork "unclean food," because in olden days people died eating pork.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 7:47 am 
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YES, agreed! I do worm mine on a regular schedule.

I thought there was another type of worm etc, trichinosis. I just couldnt remember the name and details etc, until it was listed by the users above and the website that was supplied.

Thanks


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 12:04 am 
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Worming is neccissary feeding any raw meets.
Mine don't care alot for pork but will eat it. Beef and deer they "Love"
I think it was LittleBlackBook that said above to add fats. Definitly..Fats are actualy good for them. They infact help develop their sences such as scent,sight and sound. Not to mention help keep their skin and coat healthy.
Also. Most butcher shops are glad to have you get their scraps been as they have to pay to have them hauled off. =)

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 12:00 pm 
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Dogs use fat as a secondary energy source after the carbs are burned up. That is why you want to add fat, not to mention for the keeping warm factor in winter months


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 1:33 pm 
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Article on MSNBC -- http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30311890/

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Raw deal? Some feed their pets uncooked diet
But most vets fear foodborne illnesses, say trend can harm the furry foodies

By Kim Campbell Thornton
msnbc.com contributor
updated 8:25 a.m. CT, Tues., April 21, 2009

BARF. It’s what’s for dinner. Your dog’s dinner, that is.

The acronym stands for Biologically Appropriate Raw Food, which is not so much a diet as it is a movement among pet owners who believe their pets will benefit from eating the same kinds of food their furry ancestors gobbled: bones, raw meats and veggies. Just as a raw food trend has turned more mainstream among people, a small but vocal community of pet owners is using the same quality ingredients they buy for themselves to create homemade raw meals for their critters.

But most veterinarians are wary about the trend toward raw food, or even meals that are cooked, but homemade. The idea of feeding pets raw meat, which has the potential to be contaminated with salmonella or E. coli bacteria, or a home-cooked meal that may not be properly balanced, gives them the shudders. “So many of these people are just trying to make their pets happy and have no concept of nutrition,” says Dr. Patty Khuly, who practices in Miami.

Although no studies have been conducted to assess the benefits of a raw food diet for cats and dogs, believers in the raw pet food movement say the evidence speaks for itself: Their pets have shinier coats, stronger teeth, fewer ear infections and improved weight control.

Bob Kurtz, who was already feeding his retrievers a high-quality dry food, recently turned to a commercial raw diet to solve a young Labrador’s skin allergies.

“Since switching to raw, we have found several major benefits,” he says. “Our dogs’ weights have stabilized perfectly. They now rarely change weight by more than a pound between checkups. They are lean and muscular, with coats that are even more beautiful and glossy than before. The ground bone in the diet does a great job of scouring their teeth, and all signs of plaque and tartar buildup have disappeared.”

Pat Puckett, a founder of SoCal BARF, a buying association based in Orange County, Calif., began feeding a raw diet to her American pit bull terriers in 1998.

“My breed has a tendency toward skin problems, and I had spent quite a bit of time at the vet for various problems,” she says. “One of my friends who also has the breed had talked about switching over to raw for her dogs. I moved in that direction and never went back.”

Kurtz says the diet gets a mixed reaction from the veterinarians who see his dogs.

“Our practice has two vets. The senior vet is very wary about bacterial growth, E. coli, salmonella, etc. She has recommended to us many times that we cook the food instead," Kurtz says. "The younger vet is very excited about the growth of raw and homemade diets, is not particularly concerned about bacteria in the dog's shorter digestive system, and is very pleased with our results. As she says about our Labrador, ‘Ooh, look at her coat — she's sleek, like a seal!’”

A raw diet isn't as easy as dropping a chicken bone into Baxter's bowl. It’s essential to use a trustworthy recipe that provides all the nutrients a dog or cat needs or to feed a great enough variety of fresh foods that the diet is balanced over time, in the same way that a person who eats a variety of foods achieves a balanced diet. People who are concerned about providing a correct balance of nutrients or who don’t have time to prepare a pets’ meals can purchase commercial frozen raw diets at pet supply stores.

Dr. Deborah S. Greco, an internal medicine specialist, advises dog breeders who fed a raw diet to rotate protein sources rather than relying exclusively on a single protein, such as chicken.

“What I usually recommend for people who are feeding homemade diets is to call a nutritionist and say ‘This is what I’m feeding; is it balanced?’”

Dr. Khuly, the Miami veterinarian, proffers the same advice to her clients. She will consult a nutritionist for them, for a fee, or refer them to a veterinary nutritionist for a personal consultation. She says there is another reason veterinarians are conservative when it comes to recommending raw or homemade diets.

“Veterinarians want to be legally safe, and there are things that can go wrong with feeding anything,” she says. “If there’s a commercial entity to back you up, it makes it so much easier. If there’s just your diet, your recipes and your recommendation, you’re the one out on the line."

When done right, the greatest benefit of a homemade diet is the ability to select the ingredients. Puckett and the approximately 400 members of SoCal BARF want to know how the food animal was fed. They prefer to avoid soy-fed poultry and rabbits, for instance, because soy is a common pet allergen. That’s difficult, though. Soy is in almost every poultry and rabbit feed, she says.

“The dogs are healthier than any I’ve ever had who were primarily kibble-fed,” says Shirley Thistlethwaite, who lives in a rural area near Columbia, S.C., and feeds her six dogs cooked homemade meals using a rough ratio of one-third meat, one-third grains and one-third vegetables, fruits or herbs.

Thistlethwaite buys the highest-quality foods she can work into her budget each week.

“I try to get wild-caught fish, free-range meats, and organic and local foods if I can,” she says. Often, she and her dogs eat similar meals.

But not everyone has such a positive experience. After a massive pet food recall in 2007, Margaret Alexander of Newton, Mass., began cooking for her three Cavalier King Charles spaniels. She read a lot and consulted her own veterinarian as well as veterinarians at Angell Memorial Hospital in Boston. A year later, however, all three of her dogs developed various problems that may or may not have been related to their diet.

“The oldest one developed very serious liver and gall bladder problems and was hospitalized for several days,” she says. “The youngest dog developed slow digestive processes and lots of vomiting in the summer. The third one, in the fall, developed some type of problem which was initially thought to be a blockage. He has had what are euphemistically called 'dietary indiscretions' since we got him.”

Alexander suspects that the food she was preparing was too high in fat. Now her oldest dog is eating a diet prescribed by the veterinarian and the other two are back on a high-quality dry food. She’s happy with the foods they’re eating now, citing cost and convenience.

“The dry food is measurably cheaper than home cooking," Alexander says. "Expecting a pet sitter to prepare the dogs’ food is a little more than we think we can ask, and it is hard to prepare enough in advance.”

Khuly has a handful of clients who feed their pets a raw diet, and she herself has moved from ambivalence to cautious acceptance. Her two French bulldogs now enjoy regular raw meaty bones. Clients who want to start feeding their pets a raw or homemade diet are referred to a veterinary nutritionist for expert advice on what and how to feed.

“I believe in raw feeding, I believe it can be done well, I believe it can be helpful, but I have a lot of conditions because I’m still new to it,” she says. “I tell people to have a good relationship with a high-quality butcher and make sure they understand that the meat needs to be human-grade, every bit as high-quality as they would expect you to want to eat. You have to work hard at it.”


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 2:35 pm 
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Yours touched on another subject I think about often Drew.
Free range vs Farmed. They talk all the time about the illnesses and such from eating raw meat, and how people get sick from it and all but.....It always happens with farmed foods. Just like the mad cow dieses (*sp) that came from them feeding meats in their cattle feeds. Cows aren't meet eaters. Salmanila in chickens, their cases were always chickens raises in those big plants where they keep half a dozen chickens in a pen they can't turn around in. Most egg chickens can't even stand, they never have to move.
You mean foods from animals that are processed like this then yeah, I can see their point, but if you have cattle out in the pasture, or chickens roaming the farm, or even a deer out back, you're NOT gona see this stuff. Maybe 1 in 100 million have something. The more natural the better. I've went back to eating things like this myself. I went more than 8 years without buying "Any" meat from the store. Hunted or gardened for everything I ate. Last time I "Did" buy meat from the store, All I had was deer and we were having family over. One of them said they would NOT eat it so I bought them a lb of burger. =/
Just my oppinion on it.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 4:17 pm 
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I always get people telling me this is wrong with the feed or that is wrong with it. Some just don't care enough to think about the feed.
I understand some people just don't have the time it takes to prepare the feed. Look at salmonila. Humans can get it just as dogs can. If you properly take care of the feed and your home, you will cut that risk way down.
I feed chicken mostly frozen, not thawed. I don't leave chicken in the fridge or out on the counter for minutes or hours.
I clean ANYTHING raw chicken has touched with bleach. Not hours or days later. I do it just after the feed is done. I wash out feed bowls after the dogs eat...everytime. Some vets, as people, have deals with dog feed companies and make a little money of selling the feed. Those folks will never tell you to stop feeding something they make money off of. Not to mention if you properly worm the dogs every month you are further ensuring the risk being kept to a minimum.
I have been feeding RAW solely with up to 5 dogs now for about 3 years and I have had NO problems.


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PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 11:26 pm 
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i have done this before during the winter.. the meat has a higher content of fats and proteins to keep the dog from losing weight and to keep them strong. i give them scraps of meat all the time.

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